No question, just posted for interest. I bought a 912 that had low hours but had been left outside in the elements of UAE (heat, water, sand) for a couple of years. I’ve completely stripped the engine down to crankcase (not split) and cleaned, spent a fortune on replacement parts, Rotax tools, measuring equipment, general tooling and undergone Rotax training. I’m now at the stage of beginning the rebuild so thought I would share the pain. If there is interest I’ll post more pics as I go along. Alan
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  • Re: 912uls engine rebuild

    by » 6 months ago


    I‘d apprechiate some pics to see the progress and read something about the process. So, if you found some time to report...
    Go ahead!
    Peter

  • Re: 912uls engine rebuild

    by » 6 months ago


    No problem, I will do my best

  • Re: 912uls engine rebuild

    by » 4 months ago


    I would enjoy following your progress. I admire your courage to tackle this project.

  • Re: 912uls engine rebuild

    by » 4 months ago


    your confident enough in the bearings to not split the case and inspect the crankshaft and camshaft? "heat, water, sand" would cause me to do a complete tear down

  • Re: 912uls engine rebuild

    by » 3 weeks ago


    I'm confident enough not to split the crankcase as this is not allowed by Rotax for the 912/914. I can visually inspect interior with the pistons removed and with the use of a boroscope to see the areas that are out of sight. However, before I started the re-build in earnest I wanted to complete my IRMT 912/914 Rotax heavy maintenance course which I did at CFSAero located in Coventry UK so feel very confident now about the project. Also access to some very experienced engineers to bounce any of my concerns off makes life easier.

    Having all the special tools also makes most jobs on the engine straight forward.

    All seals and bearings that were exposed to the heat, sand and rain have been replaced, along with all other seals that are accessible during the strip down. Also all electrical items and any item that had excessive corrosion have also been replaced.

    Decided to replace all the pistons and one cylinder after visual inspection but i'm waiting for my hardness tester to arrive to assess the remaining cylinders and cylinder heads. (fingers crossed on the hardness tests as this could get very expensive!)

    One issue I have noticed is that the new pistons i have received from California Power Systems are sized at 83.919mm smaller than the minimum new size quoted in the heavy maintenance which is 83.988. I've sent a query to CPS to resolve but if anyone here can offer advice I would be grateful

    New Cylinder Head arrived but was "B" version and I need "A" so that has to be sent back and replaced also! 

     

    Cost to date, excluding the the training and the special tools, is still less than a new engine but the difference is getting smaller!

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