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hello!!

Easy question. In a SLSA, who is legally authorized (US) to change the pitch of the prop? any reference to a doc, manuals, etc. are appreciated. 

Thanks!

  • Re: Changing the propeller pitch

    by » 9 months ago


    Easy question, not! So the easy answer is, it depends. I found this article is a good one to get you started: https://www.aviationsafetymagazine.com/features/maintaining-light-sport-aircraft/


  • Re: Changing the propeller pitch

    by » 9 months ago


    hello Carlos

    Under the FAA rules for light sport "special" airworthiness certificate holders that is all determined by the OEM who signed the FAA 8130-15 compliance statement with the FAA.  With your aircraft there will be an OEM approved manual for your aircraft make and model from the manufacturer.  Within that they will set the terms of what can be done on that aircraft.  

    Don't get too worried if they did not cover pitch settings, you still have an option if they did not.  If there is no data or method of adjustment given then apply to your OEM,  request the documentation to outline the process.  They must provide you with the information on how to do it, what tools are required and also any continued airworthiness to inspect it.  This would then become part of your manual.  Put the information in you logbook, or the A&P or LSRM would have to put it in if you are not allowed to do it.  Normally on an SLSA that work has to be signed off by the A&P or LSRM who did the actual work.  In an experimental, ELSA, anyone can do it but you still need whoever has the repairmans ticket for that aircraft to sign it off as airworthy. 

    The key element to remember, it is all under the authority of the OEM to support your work or any changes.  The FAA does not have any format like a form 337 for light sport.  Under the ASTM standards there is a process to do it if they did not put anything in the manual. 

    Cheers


  • Re: Changing the propeller pitch

    by » 9 months ago


    Mike Busch of Savvy Aviation, columnist and maintenance guru, recently did a seminar on "legal interpretations" of FAA rules. The stated rule is in 14 CFR, Subpart D, 91.327. As such, the manufacturer dictates what's required. This includes every "safety directive" from them and/or Rotax Mandatory Service Bulletin and maintenance requirements, including the 12 year/2,000 hour TBO, according to a legal interpretation under the name of Willette. As such, it's a far more restrictive requirement than a type-certified aircraft which can be modified via STC or 337 and, for private use, only an AD has mandatory compliance. A later interpretation (Keller) says, roughly, no. A formal request to resolve this has been denied - the unofficial excuse being that it would be resolved in MOSAIC. I don't know if this will happen or not.


  • Re: Changing the propeller pitch

    by » 9 months ago


    I have done probably 200+ props.  I can adjust a prop's pitch in 30 minutes. It's easy. If you have any questions about how to set it, be accurate  and get the rpm you want just give me a call ? ?. 

    I find new mfg planes with factory adjusted props out as much as 1 degree at times. I consider anything more than 1/10th a degree out a sin.  Even a bubble level can get you that close. A digital level has no excuse. Some aircraft Mfg's have also set the pitch so course that you only get 5200 rpm at WOT in evel flight. Another sin. Another issue I have been surprised about is many A&P mechanics don't know how to do this.

    I teach this in my Rotax class since it's  a very intricate part of the engine and aircraft performance.


    Roger Lee
    LSRM-A & Rotax Instructor & Rotax IRC
    Tucson, AZ Ryan Airfield (KRYN)
    520-349-7056 Cell


  • Re: Changing the propeller pitch

    by » 9 months ago


    Hi all

    i am rather surprised at some of the answers.  Simply speaking just look in your maintenance manual that came with your SLSA aircraft.  It has or has not information on how to set the prop.  If it has you are golden, seek out an A&P or LSRM who can do this for you, or just send Roger a plane ticket to come and do it in 30 mins.  

    As to any advice from Mike Busch giving advise on light sport, especially Rotax, frankly that is not a good recommendation.  The rules are simple, the FAA made the OEM of the aircraft responsible.  Any bulletin from Rotax published, ASB, SB, SI, or SL only applies if the OEM issue a "safety directive" that has the same force of an AD.  The FAA can only issue an AD on certified engines and aircraft.  If your aircraft is fitted with an engine that has a certification, not just an ASTM approved one, then the FAA can indeed force you to comply with that AD.  Just remember when we get into these discussions that in a court of law the owner of the aircraft would have to justify not complying with bullitians.  As such the pilot would then by default be flying an aircraft that was not airworthy.  This interpretation is what is used in civil cases and in an accident using the line "I did not have to do it according to..." That argument is difficult to defend. 

    Just my opinion

    Cheers


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