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  • Re: Gurgle for oil level check

    by » 12 years ago


    I've had some anecdotal evidence to suggest that if you turn the prop slowly... pausing as you feel the compression, it gurgles faster. I have no idea why that would be, but it just seems to work.

    Also... make sure the oil cap is off.

    - Chris

  • Re: Gurgle for oil level check

    by » 12 years ago


    Chris the reason to stop on the compression stroke is to allow the compressed air to bypass the rings and pressurize the crankcase to force the oil back into the reservoir. I like to check my oil after each flight. It gives me a good indication of actual oil level as well as oil consumption (if any). Then the next time I'm ready to fly I just make sure the oil level is within the flat on the dip stick. Always idle around 2000 RPM for a minute before advancing to a higher RPM.

  • Re: Gurgle for oil level check

    by » 12 years ago


    Prop slowly. Let the gases blow by the pistons and push the oil out and up.

    I have also discovered that my Sting Sport gurgles quicker with fresh, clean oil than with old, dirty oil. I have thus shifted to 30-35 hour oil changes. Also, if I prop it while warm after use, it gurgles quicker the next morning while cold. Cold air temps; dirty, thick oil; lack of gurgle, whilst warm after the previous run; can make for 45-150 prop turns on my airplae. Sometimes, I got NO gurgle at all, no matter how many props.

    Now, with clean oil, warmer summer air temps, and pre-gurgling (at last use), I consistently hear that lovely sound, mostly after just 4-14 turns of a prop blade!

    Thank you said by: YEN NIEN YU

  • Re: Gurgle for oil level check

    by » 12 years ago


    If you check the oil level and find it in the normal range, is there any reason to burp the engine? I suppose the crankcase could be overfilled, but other than that?

  • Re: Gurgle for oil level check

    by » 12 years ago


    Without burping the engine even though you have oil in the mid range on your dip stick, there is a possibility that you may have air in the oil line which could starve the engine of oil during the start cycle. It is always best to rotate the engine until you hear a burp and have oil at least mid way on the flat. You don't have to burp it any more, but you should run the engine at idle (2000RPM) for at least one minute before increasing the RPM to a higher setting. I still like to burp the engine after each flight to get an accurate reading as to the actual oil quantity in the tank. Then when I burp it on the next flight and it shows only half on the dip stick I know that I have plenty of oil.

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