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Greetings,

I've been looking into the airbox since I'd like to get cool air to the carbs.  In all the pictures I've found, nothing really shows the ducting to the airbox.  I've seen a filter mounted on one inlet for under cowl air that doubles as carb heat, and the other inlet never seems to have any ducting.    Are people running that to a ram air scoop with no filter, or some remotely mounted filtered air box?  

Thanks,

Rusty

  • Re: Airbox ducting?

    by » one month ago


    I have a fiberglass airbox on my Europa, it works well with a K&N automotive filter.

     

    34014_2_5941217C-EE9C-4EC6-9929-F20DE13EE022.jpeg (You do not have access to download this file.)
    34014_2_3E8EF804-EFB1-40CC-9FE2-5A83440EAE58.jpeg (You do not have access to download this file.)

  • Re: Airbox ducting?

    by » one month ago


    As much as I hate working with fiberglass, it certainly is an option.  I have a challenging space to put this in, and it's likely the stock airbox wouldn't fit anyway.  I'd love to have one for about an hour just to see if there's any way to make it fit.

    Thanks,

    Rusty


  • Re: Airbox ducting?

    by » one month ago


    I made my own naca duct and used an inline 3 to 4 inch filter from summit racing or somewhere like that.

    I put a 90 elbow and y pipe right to the 2 carbs.

    Biggest thing is to make sure you run the carb vents to somewhere behind the filter so they are at the same pressure....ask me how I know😀


  • Re: Airbox ducting?

    by » one month ago


    I never thought of an inline air filter box.  Something like this one?  https://www.summitracing.com/parts/spe-9833

    I do like a shared airbox though, since both carbs would be drawing from the same pressure.  I'm still debating carb heat options.

    Thanks,

    Rusty

     


  • Re: Airbox ducting?

    by » one month ago


    Good debate.

    I assume that you want to go down the "airbox" route as a potential way to gain improved engine performance.

    If the above is correct, you may be disappointed or at least not get as much improvement as you had hoped and moneys/effort/time spent.

    I would suggest using a cheap fridge style digital thermometer (one with a nice long lead) to obtain operational air temperatures close to the (I assume) existing conical air filters. Depending on your cowling design you may be surprise at how little above ambient the air entering your carburettors actually is.

    My last aircraft had a fairly consistent 10C above ambient in all stages of flight - I decided against ducting cooler air to the carbs. My aircraft had no facility for carb heat, I felt the plus 10C was probably helping to minimise the chance of an icing incident.

    One additional point; I recently met a pilot who had experienced a catastrophic prop failure. He attributed the lack of an airbox to his survival. The violence of the unbalanced prop, shook the carburettors from their inlet manifolds stopping the engine faster than he could react. He managed to land the aircraft safely, despite the engine hanging from its mount at an odd angle. Had the engine continued to run for even a fraction of a second longer, it would have departed the airframe and he would have died in the ensuing loss of control/crash.

     


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