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I forgot to ask do we have to turn the prop many times  before a flight or just when we check the amout of oil? Thanks

  • Re: gurgle on the oil tank

    by » 2 weeks ago


    First flight of the day - should be part of your pre engine start/flight checklist.


  • Re: gurgle on the oil tank

    by » 2 weeks ago


    Rotax specifies the 912 burping procedure for only one purpose… To accurately check the oil level.

    Unless you suspect oil loss you don’t need to do it every day. It is also easier and more accurate to do it on a warm engine. 


    Walt

    my blog; waltsrv12.com


  • Re: gurgle on the oil tank

    by » 2 weeks ago


    "Unless you suspect oil loss you don’t need to do it every day. It is also easier and more accurate to do it on a warm engine."

    No offence Walt- I do not agree.

    There are only very few engines, of any description, where the oil is checked hot/warm, for the simple reason that a recently run engine will give a false low oil level/quantity reading. The dipstick is calibrated to indicate total oil capacity ie it does not measure oil that is still running down the walls of the cylinders/crankcase.A check,after engine run, may result in an oil overfill situation. This could result in excessive pressure on seals (damage) and will almost certainly result in oil being blown out the breather (waste of $$)

    Oil should be checked, before first start of the day (engine cold), with the aircraft/vehicle on a level surface. Doesn't matter that its a tail/nose wheel, as long as the reading is consistent. ie level surface with aircraft in usual standing position.

    I know of at least one person who, like you, doesn't bother Burping/Gurgling their Rotax 9 and so far no problems, however I feel that this is poor/lazy practice, simply because doing this little prestart ritual will ;

    Ensure no oil in the combustion chamber.

    Compression check, on each cylinder, as normal.

    A small degree of pre lubrication - reduces wear & may require less energy to turn over.

    Adequate oil for flight.

    Propellers blades are all secure.

    Even before I had a Rotax, I turned my LyCon's over by hand, before the first start of the day. It's just a good habit to adopt - IGNITION OFF.


  • Re: gurgle on the oil tank

    by » 2 weeks ago


    It’s a dry sump engine, different animal than a Lycoming. The oil will move back to the canister much easier when warm (setting 5-10 minutes) and give a more accurate reading. 

    The Rotax will not have oil in the cylinders unless you mount the canister wrong. 

    This insistence to check every day and supporting argument, one could ask why not check every startup?

    If you are flying a plane that others use or is kept outside where it might be “touched” then checking every day before starting would be recommended, but not for the reasons you suggest. 

    Your own plane, kept in a hangar that is checked at the end of the flight where nobody else messes with it would only be necessary to check if there was a puddle of oil on the ground. 


    Walt

    my blog; waltsrv12.com


  • Re: gurgle on the oil tank

    by » 2 weeks ago


    In fact, it is advice that is requested...
    Follow the Rotax documentation: Slowly turn the propeller before the first flight of the day, until you hear the "burp".
    This will push out any oil present in the crankcase.
    At the same time, check the oil level.😉

    I completely agree with Sean Griffit

    Jacques


    Thank you said by: Sean Griffin

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