fbpx

 

Umm....... I mounted my rectifier and these parts aren't on page 24-00-00 page 8, any ideas? The numbers on the label don't match anything in the manual.

Also, what is the difference between R= red-to battery, positive terminal and +B= battery positive terminal? Is the R from the Rectifier to the battery, and the +B a hot power lead?

 

TIA

10147_1_914 rectifier parts 1.jpg (You do not have access to download this file.)
10147_1_914 rectifier parts 3.jpg (You do not have access to download this file.)
10147_1_914 rectifier parts 4.jpg (You do not have access to download this file.)
  • Re: 914 rectifier parts?

    by » 9 months ago


    Hi Steve

    The wire part number, 864250, is for a oil pressure sender and nothing to do with the regulator.  

    The wire code is found in any of the 912/914 installation manuals.

    Cheers

    37993_2_reg wire code.jpg (You do not have access to download this file.)

    Thank you said by: Steve Crewdog

  • Re: 914 rectifier parts?

    by » 9 months ago


    I've been puzzling over this myself. On Page 19-21 of Section 24-00-00 I find this schematic. I'm not an electronic engineer and this seems quite confusing to me as you basically connect R, B+, & C together, then route to the battery.  What's confusing is that in my plane they each take a different path to the battery + lead and I don't understand why.

    In my Model 4-1200 (just acquired last month), thee wiring is as follows:

    G/G: Stator Leads

    R: Charge Lead which goes to a Circuit Breaker on the panel, then to a  fused block (near the battery), then to the battery + terminal

    B: Shorted (connected to R)

    L: Low charge warning light (LED)

    C: Battery Relay goes to the batter + side via a small fuse block, mounted on the firewall inside cabin.

    My plane (which I just acquired) did not have a capacitor installed, so I'm in process of adding a capacitor next week. What I am still fuzzy about is how to connect the capacitor?

    Do I short B to C, then from C to the + side of the capacitor? Or do I simply connect a wire from C to the Capacitor + side and leave the rest alone.

    I understand basic wiring of both AC & DC circuitry, but this one is beyond me!

    38006_2_23-10_0017.jpg (You do not have access to download this file.)
    38006_2_Capture.JPG (You do not have access to download this file.)

    Model IV-1200 Tricycle Gear w/ Speed Wings

    RV4 in Progress


    Thank you said by: Steve Crewdog

  • Re: 914 rectifier parts?

    by » 9 months ago


    Think of the R and B+ leads as a parallel connection from the output of the regulator to the battery/buss.  They are internally connected inside the regulator. The C lead senses the bus voltage and controls the regulator output accordingly.  The external capacitor (22000 MFD 50V) adds stability to the output circuit and would ideally be connected at the junction of the R, B+ and C leads as shown.  However, if your C lead connects at a different physical location, then connect the capacitor at the R, B+ junction. Remember most capacitors are polar, so connect the plus side to R, B+ junction and the negative side to airframe ground. The negative side should be marked in some way, often with a (-).  You should also have a capacitor (1 MFD 50V) at the electric fuel pump if you have one.  This connects across the +/- leads at the pump, and again pay attention to polarity.     


  • Re: 914 rectifier parts?

    by » 9 months ago


    Be careful with unit annotations on capacitors.  "MFD" was once used for microfarad, but a capital M now means "mega" (106),  The modern annotation of microfarad is "μF" (Greek letter mu, 10-6).

    https://www.nist.gov/pml/owm/metric-si-prefixes

    WRT R, B+ and C connections, Jeff is exactly right.  I'll just add one comment.  The C terminal should be connected to whatever point in the system that you want the regulated voltage to appear.  This will typically be the "+" terminal of the battery.  It should not share a wire with the R/B+ connection; that is, it must go back to the regulator as a separate wire (small wire gauge is fine, as it carries virtually no current).  If it's connected to R/B+ at the regulator, then it won't be able to compensate for the voltage drop in the R/B+ wire and bus voltage will be lower than desired.


You do not have permissions to reply to this topic.