fbpx

 

Hi There

Since a year we experienced 6 partial power losses after take-off. All of them were not reproduceable after Landing and after every event we had maintenance made a 100h/200h inspection. Our Aquila A210 is flying roughly 600h a year. While an event happened during fall, where we expected carb icing, all events were during spring/summer, and we are using MOGAS.

After another event during spring, our club decided to replace the engine with a brand new 912S3. Unfortunately with the new engine we had another 3 power loss events during initial climb out.

Between the events there are several weeks without any happening, and we are flying some 3hrs a day.

As another plane (same type) also had an similar issue at our homebase (Switzerland, 1900ft MSL, around 60-90°F ), but not using same maintenance shop, we mentioned fuel issues, but fuel was checked and no alcohol nor water was found.

As we are running out of options and maintenance cannot find anything on the tech side we decided to fly with AVGAS ufn.

=> AFM says to switch on fuel pump before takeoff, which we do.

Are there any other tipps, what we could inspect. or is it really just vapour lock? thanks for any advice!

  • Re: 912 S3 partial power loss after Takeoff

    by » 12 months ago


    Hello Pascal

    From what you say I would also guess perhaps vapor lock with the MOGAS.  Auto fuels have variable RVP, reid vapor pressure.  It is rather difficult to check what level of RVP you have so best guess might be you are getting some winter fuel.  Spring flying is the real risky area as a lot of fuel supplies are still in change over from winter blends that have high RVP, more vaporization, than sumer blends.  The common practice from the fuel producer/supplier is to sell fuel with a lot of Butane in it to increase vapor for cold weather starting.  Summer fuels are very low RVP and usually cost more than winter fuel. Check your fuel supplier and ask when they changed blends.  if people are buying winter blend in the spring it can create a lot of issues.  If your switch to AVGAS has solved this issue then you have your answer and need look no more.  

    A check here shows the numbers for EN228 

    This requirement has been transposed into BS EN 228:2012 which specifies a summer minimum and maximum RVP of 45 - 70 kPa and winter minimum and maximum RVP of 70 - 100 kPa


  • Re: 912 S3 partial power loss after Takeoff

    by » 12 months ago


    Have you complied with this

    Ref: IM-73-00-00

    Fuel System

    Sounds like Vapour lock to me, where you haven't fitted the return line with the restrictor jet:  

    Incorporation of the mandatory fuel return line of ROTAX Engine Type 912 (Series)


  • Re: 912 S3 partial power loss after Takeoff

    by » 12 months ago


    You may also like to consider the Vans RV-12 recommendation to install a higher capacity fuel boost pump:

     Facet Cube40135  can be purchased on its own or in the kit Part  Number FEP12SV

     

     


  • Re: 912 S3 partial power loss after Takeoff

    by » 12 months ago


    Your experiencing detonation. See the latest Aquila ASB calling for new exhaust. We maintain two AT-01-100 and both engines have detonated multiple times although the club runs on AVGAS. New exhaust for less back pressure at 156/2.72 jetting cures this. 

    We also installed EGT under CSTAN  

    https://aquila-aviation.de/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/SB_AT01_041_A01_exhaust_912_O44mm.pdf

    36590_2_IMG_4200.jpeg (You do not have access to download this file.)
    36590_2_IMG_4161.jpeg (You do not have access to download this file.)

  • Re: 912 S3 partial power loss after Takeoff

    by » 12 months ago


    Rotax Wizard wrote:

    Hello Pascal

    From what you say I would also guess perhaps vapor lock with the MOGAS.  Auto fuels have variable RVP, reid vapor pressure.  It is rather difficult to check what level of RVP you have so best guess might be you are getting some winter fuel.  Spring flying is the real risky area as a lot of fuel supplies are still in change over from winter blends that have high RVP, more vaporization, than sumer blends.  The common practice from the fuel producer/supplier is to sell fuel with a lot of Butane in it to increase vapor for cold weather starting.  Summer fuels are very low RVP and usually cost more than winter fuel. Check your fuel supplier and ask when they changed blends.  if people are buying winter blend in the spring it can create a lot of issues.  If your switch to AVGAS has solved this issue then you have your answer and need look no more.  

    A check here shows the numbers for EN228 

    This requirement has been transposed into BS EN 228:2012 which specifies a summer minimum and maximum RVP of 45 - 70 kPa and winter minimum and maximum RVP of 70 - 100 kPa

    indeed we also have to use winter type, but our airport is trying to minimize the amount filled up in the tank and switches back to summer mix asap it is available again... will have to check that with the airport... thx


You do not have permissions to reply to this topic.